Ask This Question to Beat Your Competition

Business is a hard competition. Sometimes it’s winner take all. Often, it’s dividing an existing market. Once in a while, it’s sharing an expanding market.

Regardless, any business team worth its mettle is spending at least some time determining how to go to market better, maintain share leadership, increase share or build a new business. They’re also thinking about how to beat their competitors. That means you!

An executive at Dick’s Sporting Goods demonstrates how to practically boil down such critical strategic and competitor assessments. Steve Miller, SVP of Strategy, Ecommerce and Analytics, asks this powerful question, per Lisa Lacy writing in Adweek:

  • “If there was a store that would open next to us that would scare us, what would that store look like?”

This is simple. Direct. Easy for everyone to understand. So incredibly useful.

Do you and your team think this way? Do you ask yourselves this type of powerful, direct question? Or, are you hung up in fancy, time-consuming exercises that nobody likes to do and no one will look at afterwards?


The Dick’s question is a good example of “scenario planning,” an approach that I’ve found helpful in my career. When organized properly, this type of activity is practical and effective, and can easily be repeated as necessary. Some related question examples:

  • “Wow. If our competitor did X, that would really scare us. What proactive steps should we take for competitive protection?”
  • “You know, if we took action A, we’d really increase sales and profits and position ourselves for sustained success.”
  • What do we expect our competitors to do in the next six months? How would we be prepared to act?

Framing your question(s) is critical for success, and how you do that depends on your particular business dynamics and personal style. You’ll want to create excitement and interest, though, so go with direct, conversational language.

For maximum effect, try this question:

  • “If we did X, we’d really drive our business forward and kick our competitor’s butt.”

Encourage your teams to adopt this type of business mindset for direct assessment, and both strategic and opportunistic thinking and action. Conduct regular sessions, whether informal or a bit more formal, to capture ideas and concerns, make improvements, and take advantage of opportunities.

Just remember, whether or not you think this way and ask these kind of questions, your competitors almost certainly are! They want to win now, too.



Harvey Chimoff is a customer-focused global business leader who connects marketing across the organization to drive performance and achieve business objectives. His B2B and CPG marketing expertise includes agribusiness, ingredients and food and beverage. Contact him at harveychimoff.com.

Make Your Trade Shows More Strategic and Higher ROI

“Let’s exhibit at trade show X” is a common refrain among sales and marketing teams.

That’s no surprise, considering the scope of the global trade show industry. Various estimates put global trade show revenue in the low $30 billion range, with the United States comprising about 50%. Whatever the number, trade shows are big business: for the show organizers, stand designers, stand builders, brochure writers, hotels and every other business sector that’s involved and benefits.

But what do sales and marketing teams and their companies get out of trade shows?

Ahh, that’s a difficult question to answer, and I say that as a marketing leader who has extensive involvement with B2B trade shows. I’m back from this month’s Vitafoods show in Europe, and while walking the expansive exhibit hall I wondered about the massive investments, the decision-making processes and the hoped-for results.

The first challenge for many companies is that they don’t have a well-defined answer to this question: Why are we exhibiting at trade show X and what is the purpose of our investment?

Sure, the teams at those companies will say something like we need to be there to support our business or we need to be “seen” in the industry. That’s not good enough. How many can articulate the defined objectives, or better yet, have them integrated and written into the annual marketing plan? My view is that, for a high percentage, the process is quite informal. Year-to-year decision-making may even kind of roll over in autopilot mode. That doesn’t automatically make it a bad process, but it does make it one less optimized for success. With so many pressures on sales and marketing teams, it’s better to increase, rather than decrease, success factors.

There are numerous reasons for making a trade show investment, including for example:

  • Accessing a new market
  • Penetrating an existing market
  • Building or solidifying the company image
  • Launching a new product or service
  • Searching for channel partners
  • FOMO (fear of missing out) or more accurately stated FONBT (fear of not being there)

My view is that the trade show part of the marketing mix should be treated with the same marketing discipline respect as the rest of the marketing strategy and plan. However, lack of discipline with trade shows may be indicative of the same for the overall marketing strategy and plan process! (For more on that subject, you can read my post Why Your Business Needs “Marketing Discipline.”)

9 Action Points” to Make Your Trade Shows More Strategic and Higher ROI

Want to separate yourself from your competitors? Here are nine easy ways to get started.

  1. Understand your company’s commercial objectives
  2. Determine if and how trade shows can help achieve those objectives
  3. Identify the most relevant trade shows
  4. Prepare written objectives
  5. Customize your participation to engage the desired target(s) at each show
  6. Formally prepare and brief your trade show team (everyone who will be representing the company at the stand)
  7. Devise some system for visitor capture, tracking and post-show action analysis. Pre COVID, my recommendation was to automate visitor tracking with easy mobile phone scanning software that scans visitor badges and enables easy note-taking. At Vitafoods, there were only phone-based digital badges, which would have made scanning awkward.
  8. Conduct a post-show analysis and prepare a written report. What worked well? Where were you short? What are good ideas for next time? Should there be a next time?
  9. Include a “fully-loaded” analysis in your post show report. What’s that? Well, your company is spending serious cash to fly-in, hotel and feed the onsite team. What does that cost in addition to the stand space, stand build and whatever else went into your total stand presentation? The fully-loaded number may surprise internal leaders, but the head of marketing should know the company investment and be comfortable that it’s a good use of resources. At the same time, the head of sales should agree that this type of total company investment (marketing and travel funds) is appropriate to help achieve the annual objectives.

For 12 more action points to help maximize your trade show marketing, read my article published in Sales & Marketing Management, titled: Put the Marketing in Your Trade Shows.

(Photo Credit: Vitafoods 2021)


Harvey Chimoff is a customer-focused global business leader who connects marketing across the organization to drive performance and achieve business objectives. His B2B and CPG marketing expertise includes agribusiness, ingredients and food and beverage. Contact him at harveychimoff.com.

Getting People to Speak Up at Work

One of the greatest challenges to a high performing organization comes from within, and it may not be what you think.

It’s getting colleagues to actually communicate with each other: to robustly and constructively share their points-of-view, ideas, recommendations, customer input, concerns and dissents. Publicly. In real time. So the issue or topic can be worked, optimized and the business driven forward. To give participants and decision-makers a deeper, wider, overall better understanding and perspective. To help the organization win in the marketplace.

Unfortunately, it doesn’t happen enough, and there are many reasons, such as:

  • Shooting the Messenger. It still happens. The bearer of tough, objective news or input gets tarnished. Nobody wants to be that person, and so the input is withheld.
  • Fear of Alternate Views/Contradiction. When the conversation includes people who hold more senior roles, other members of the team may feel uncomfortable to say something that differs from what the more senior person said and/or is thought to believe or want. Those who directly report to such leaders can also be in a difficult situation because they don’t want to embarrass or put their boss in a publicly tough spot.
  • Language Proficiency. Many companies have international colleagues whose first language is not English. Even when their English language capabilities are strong, there is sometimes an uncomfortableness to talk in English, which holds them back from engaging. If their English is a struggle, it’s worse.
  • Lack of Confidence. Sometimes, colleagues just lack the confidence or experience to speak up.

5 Action Steps for Improvement

  1. Be Authentic. Actions create the greatest impact, and colleagues watch very carefully for actual behavior versus pontification. Talk is cheap, so back it up with behavior.
  2. Start with Your Own Team. Set expectations and create an open, collaborative environment. For example, from day one I tell my global teams that I expect and want their active participation. I specifically tell them it’s okay to have a different view than mine and they can constructively challenge my thinking. Of course, they have to provide their rationale. That’s how we get better and make the best decisions. A key part of that is asking them to share their views as much as possible with specific recommendations. For this to really sink in though, there have to be times when the leader changes their mind and/or adopts an alternate idea or point of view.
  3. Encourage Action. Instill an environment in which everyone, direct reports and cross-functional colleagues, participates with an action mindset. Get in the habit of using this simple question: What do you want to do and why? Apply the same for yourself, too!
  4. Invite Participation. Similar to a teacher in a classroom, if the group seems reticent or certain people are not contributing, call on them in a positive, encouraging tone: “Susan, you’ve looked at this issue. What do you think?”
  5. Eliminate Fear. Leaders (and participants) at all levels should foster and ensure an environment in which colleagues are comfortable to speak their mind without fearing they will get in trouble. Don’t shoot the messenger. Don’t crush alternate views and dissent. Overall, be positive and encouraging, yet direct. Further, don’t be afraid of anyone saying “I don’t know.” It’s better than guessing or bullshitting. However, set the expectation that the answer and/or recommended action step is coming soon!

Inspiration Example

Here’s some inspiration to help you get started and/or to help you visualize the type of environment you’d like to create.

The United States Department of State, the diplomatic arm of America, has a mechanism called the Dissent Channel. It’s a formal policy, a bit of insurance or a backstop to ensure multiple points-of-view are put on the table. A timely reply is required. Check out these essential components:

  • Employees should “be able to express dissenting or alternative views on substantive issues of policy, in a manner which ensures serious, high-level review and response.”
  • Objective of “facilitating open, creative, and uncensored dialogue on substantive foreign policy issues.”
  • “Responsibility to foster an atmosphere supportive of such dialogue, including the opportunity to offer alternative or dissenting opinions without fear of penalty.”

Harvey Chimoff is a customer-focused global business leader who connects marketing across the organization to drive performance and achieve business objectives. His B2B and CPG marketing expertise includes agribusiness, ingredients and food and beverage. Contact him at harveychimoff.com.